I worry about my mom having a stroke. What can I do?

I worry about my mom having a stroke. What can I do?

If your loved one suffered a stroke, could you recognize it quickly? Would you know what to do? Seniors are at increased risk of stroke simply because of their age, but additional factors may increase a senior’s risk. How much do you know about stroke in seniors?

A stroke is a medical emergency in which blood can’t reach the brain. It occurs when a blood vessel is either blocked by a clot or bursts. Quickly getting a stroke victim medical help can help to minimize the damage that results from a stroke.

There are many factors that can increase a senior’s risk of having a stroke. According to the American Stroke Association, the likeliness of having a stroke almost doubles every ten years after a person reaches age 55. Women are more likely to have strokes than men, and strokes actually kill more women than men. Physical issues, like high blood pressure, diabetes, and obesity, need to be controlled in order to minimize stroke risk. A poor diet, such as one high in saturated fat and cholesterol, is a stroke risk factor. Cigarette smoking can also greatly increase the risk of stroke.

There are three common signs of stroke that you should be able to recognize, and they’re easy to remember by using the word “FAST.”

F – Face drooping. One side of the face may droop or be numb. If the person smiles, their smile may be uneven.

A – Arm weakness. Ask the person to raise both arms. One arm may droop or drift down due to weakness.

S – Speech difficulty. A stroke victim’s speech may be slurred, and they may be unable to repeat simple words.

T – Time to call 911. If you notice any of these symptoms, call 911 immediately and tell them that you think the person is having a stroke.

If you notice these symptoms, you need to call 911 immediately and get the victim help right away. If a stroke victim receives medical treatment promptly, it can help to minimize the long-term effects of the stroke and may help to save their life.

To learn more about this important topic, please join me on Facebook Live Tuesday 11/9 at 3 pm for an informative chat with our friend Kelly Cornelius, RN-BSN, Clinical Stroke Coordinator at Western Reserve Hospital. Just click on www.facebook.com/DanburySeniorLivingHudson to join the conversation.

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